Garden Planning

Thinking about revamping your backyard? We've made this low-cost low-maintenance garden plan example for you to draw inspiration from. Click around and learn how to set up a water efficient garden with minimum green waste output.

The xeriscape is organised into a raised bed filled with well draining soil. The plants used in these gardens are often succulents and cacti. However, in Australia, we have a lot of drought resistant plants that will fit right in. Plant varieties like Gazania, Desert Rose, Anigozanthos, etc. will add a lot of colour to the xeriscape and still keep water consumption and maintenance low. Using inorganic mulch like pebbles will improve the soil’s drainage, protect it from overheating and losing water through evaporation, and prevent the growth of weeds. The best spot in your garden for a xeriscape is one without any shade and full sun.  


Glossary Links:

Xeriscaping; Inorganic Mulch; Soil Drainage

The whole point of a xeriscape is to have minimal water and maintenance requirements. It can require up to 100% less watering than your turf area. This is why we recommend running a drip irrigation system under the mulch. This way you can deliver small amounts of water directly to the roots and the pebbles will keep it there until it’s fully absorbed. Aside from a once in a blue moon weeding, this is all your xeriscape needs.


Glossary Links:

Drip Irrigation

Xeriscape

Vegetables will start to bolt if the temperatures go high. This is why it's a good idea to plant them near trees, where the shade can protect them and keep the temperature optimal. Another thing to help with that is applying organic mulch. It keeps the soil cool and keeps water in the roots. Another benefit of organic mulch is that it feeds the soil as it decomposes. For a healthy organic produce compost is a strongly recommended substitute for chemical fertiliser. Set up a three bin composting system to always have some in stock. One bin for freshly composted material, one for ripening compost, and one with compost that is ready to use. Trellising vegetables like cucumbers and tomatoes is a good idea, since it keeps the produce off the ground and in the case of the former gravity helps the plant develop bigger fruit.


Glossary Links

Bolting ;Organic Mulch ;Compost ;Trellising

A vegetable garden requires continuous work to produce with maximum efficiency. Researching into companion planting will ease this process by diminishing the competition between the different plants. Setting up a drip irrigation system can be invaluable not only from water conservation stand point, but plant health wise as well. Weeding and pruning of trees (both fruit and decorative) is essential too. Every organic byproduct of gardening can be tossed into the composter to be later used as plant food. However composting weeds is not recommended since their seeds could germinate in the mixture and later invade your planters trough it. Alternatively, you can always rely on us for your garden maintenance and tree pruning.


Glossary Links

Companion Planting

Vegetable Garden

No backyard is complete without a leisure area. Leaving a patch of turf for your kids to play on or simply to sunbathe in the fresh grass is something no one should miss out on. And of course - the barbie. Covering part of the turf with stepping, tiles, or decking will make maintenance easier and lighten your water bill. Turf usually requires large amounts of water to be maintained spritely, especially in hot climate. Top dressing can help in that regard.


Glossary Links

Top Dressing

The most important thing is the regular mowing of turf areas(which we'll gladly handle for you), as this promotes healthy grass growth. Don't throw away the clippings though! This is perfect material for your composters. Remember to visit your tool shed often and maintain your gardening instruments too. The sharper and cleaner they are the better for your plants. Don't neglect your barbie either. It's not part of the garden, but the smell of old burned grease can ruin any gathering.

Leisure Area & Turf

Glossary